domingo, 25 de julio de 2010

A Step Towards Germanium Nanoelectronics



The use of germanium instead of silicon as basic material of transistors would enable faster chips containing smaller transistors. However, a number of problems still have to be solved.


The figure shows schematically the application of germanium in a CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) circuit. Note that germanium is only used in the regions of source (S), drain (D) and channel (C). Source and drain contain high concentration of foreign atoms (dopants) which provide the excess of free electrons (n+ regions) or holes (p+ regions)

Transistors are produced using foreign atoms that are implanted into the semiconductor material so that it becomes partly conducting. As this production step damages the material, it has to be repaired by subsequent annealing. So far it has not been possible to produce large-scale integrated transistors of a specific type (NMOS) using germanium. The reason: phosphorus atoms are strongly redistributed within the material during annealing.

Two novel techniques, which were applied by scientists of the research center Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD) and international colleagues, overcome this dilemma.

Higher switching speeds than in silicon could be achieved using germanium and some other semiconductors. Germanium is particularly attractive since it could be easily integrated into existing technological processes. Germanium was the basic material of first-generation transistors before it was replaced by silicon at the end of the 1960s. This was due to the excellent electronic properties of the interface between the semiconductor silicon and its insulating and passivating oxide. However, this advantage cannot be utilized if transistor dimensions are further reduced since the oxide must then be replaced by so-called high-k dielectrics. This again stimulates science and industry to search for the most suitable basic material.

By inserting foreign atoms the conductivity of semiconductors can be varied in a purposeful way. One possibility is ion implantation (ions are charged atoms) with subsequent heat treatment, which is called annealing. Annealing of the germanium crystal is necessary as the material is heavily damaged during implantation, and leads to the requested electronic properties. While these methods allow for the manufacturing of p-channel transistors (PMOS) according to future technology needs (22 nanometer technology node), it was not possible to produce corresponding n-channel transistors (NMOS) using germanium. This is due to the strong spatial redistribution (diffusion) of the phosphorus atoms which have to be used in manufacturing the n+ regions.

Physicists from the FZD applied a special annealing method that enables repairing the germanium crystal and yields good electrical properties without the diffusion of phosphorus atoms. The germanium samples were heated by short light pulses of only a few milliseconds. This period is sufficient in order to restore the crystal quality and to achieve electrical activation of phosphorus, but it is too short for the spatial redistribution of the phosphorus atoms. The light pulses were generated by the flash lamp equipment which was developed at the research center FZD. Analysis of the electrical and structural properties of the thin phosphorus-doped layers in germanium was performed in close collaboration with colleagues from the Belgian microelectronics center IMEC in Leuven and from the Fraunhofer-Center for Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT) in Dresden.

An alternative method to suppress phosphorus diffusion in germanium has been investigated by an international team consisting of researchers from Germany, Denmark and the USA, amongst them physicists from FZD. After ion implantation of phosphorus into germanium the sample was heated to a given temperature and then irradiated by protons. It could be demonstrated that this treatment leads to the reduction of phosphorus diffusion, too. The results of these experiments are explained by the influence of certain lattice defects (self-interstitials) that annihilate those lattice defects (vacancies) which are responsible for the mobility of the phosphorus atoms.

Thus, FZD physicists and their colleagues demonstrated that in principle it is possible to fabricate germanium-based n-channel transistors (NMOS) with dimensions corresponding to the most advanced technological requirements.


Freddy Vallenilla, CAF

Fast Transistors Could Save Energy



Transistors, the cornerstone of electronics, are lossy and therefore consume energy. Researchers from the ETH Zürich and EPF Lausanne have developed transistors targeting high switching speeds and higher output powers. The devices can be used more efficiently as conventional transistors, so as to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions.


Gate electrode of an AlInN/GaN HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor)

They consist of complex structures, some of which are only a few nanometers in size, and can be found in most electronic networks: transistors built from semiconductor materials deposited on a supporting substrate such as silicon carbide (SiC). Colombo Bolognesi, Professor for Millimeter-Wave Electronics at the ETH Zürich, and his research group specialize in developing high-performance transistors intended to transmit information as quickly and efficiently as possible. In order to do this, electrons must move through the semiconductor material as fast as possible. Just last year, Bolognesi`s group improved its own speed record for so-called "High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs)" based on Aluminium-Gallium Nitride (AlGaN/GaN) materials depossited on Silicon substrates. Before then, comparable technologies showed cutoff frequencies of 28 Gigahertz (GHz), but devices built by Bolognesi`s Group in the FIRST cleanroom reached cutoff frequencies as high as 108 GHz.

New Material

Bolognesi's team, now in collaboration with the group of Nicolas Grandjean (who is a Professor of Physics at the EPF Lausanne) also explores a new material: instead of using Aluminium-Gallium Nitride, the researchers exploit the favorable properties of a newer material combination consisting of Alumimium Indium Nitride (AlInN/GaN). The advantage here is that AlInN has a significantly larger "forbidden energy gap" than other commonly used semiconductors. The so-called forbidden energy gap is one of the most important properties of a semiconductor material.

Semiconductors featuring a large energy gap can be used to build transistors which operate at much higher temperatures, sustain greater voltage levels, and handle higher signal power levels than possible with smaller gap conventional materials such as Silicon. "Other researchers have already demonstrated that AlInN/GaN HEMT transistors can operate at temperatures as high as 1000 C -- that far exceeds the capabilities of Silicon and even AlGaN/GaN transistors," says Bolognesi.

Until now, AlInN/GaN transistors were however slower than their AlGaN/GaN counterparts. The researchers have now eliminated this problem. They managed to break their own record of 102 GHz, achieved with AlInN/GaN transistors built on Silicon, with an AlInN/GaN transistor built on a Silicon Carbide substrate. In a single step, they increased the cutoff frequency by 41 percent up to 144 GHz. "That is a huge improvement," states Bolognesi with delight. "Imagine for example a sprinter who would suddenly run the hundred meter 40 percent faster." And fresh from the laboratory, as this article is being written, Bolognesi reports that his team just measured cutoff frequencies as high as 200 GHz. "That shatters all records in this research field."

Significant decrease in energy consumption

One possible commercial application of similar transistors could be in the power amplifiers driving wireless transmitter antennaes. There, Gallium Nitride transistors would help reduce energy costs thanks to their higher efficiency. For example, "a mobile phone operator with 10'000 base stations equipped with conventional power amplifiers consumes on average 30 Megawatt each year, with associated CO2 emissions of 100'000 tons," says Bolognesi. "Roughly 80 percent of that energy is just wasted as heat, and even more if the transmitter equipment must be air conditioned."

By using Gallium Nitride transistors, mobile telephone operators could significantly decrease their energy consumption, and reduce their CO2 emissions by several tens of thousand tons. Note that 10'000 tons of CO2 corresponds to the CO2 emission from 5'000 mid-class automobiles driven for 10'000 kilometers per year. For reference, there is roughly 11'000 wireless base stations currently operating throughout Switzerland.

Bolognesi believes Gallium Nitride based transistors could improve wireless transmitter efficiencies from 15 to 20 percent today, up to 60 percent. The researcher credits the group`s outstanding results to his team`s process know-how and dedication, the outstanding FIRST Laboratory facilities, as well as to the quality of the materials supplied by his EPFL collaborators. Encouraged by their recent achievements, the researchers continue to work with great enthusiam to further stretch the envelope of transistor performances.


Freddy Vallenilla, CAF

Single-Atom Transistor Discovered



Researchers from Helsinki University of Technology (Finland), University of New South Wales (Australia), and University of Melbourne (Australia) have succeeded in building a working transistor, whose active region composes only of a single phosphorus atom in silicon.

(a) Colored scanning electron microscope image of the measured device. Aluminum top gate is used to induce a two-dimensional electron layer at the silicon-silicon oxide interface below the metallization. The barrier gate is partially below the top gate and depletes the electron layer in the vicinity of the phosphorus donors (the red spheres added to the original image). The barrier gate can also be used to control the conductivity of the device. All the barrier gates in the figure form their own individual transistors. (b) Measured differential conductance through the device at 4 Tesla magnetic field. The red and the yellow spheres illustrate the spin-down and -up states of a donor electron which induce the lines of high conductivity clearly visible in the figure. (Credit: American Chemical Society)

The results have just been published in Nano Letters, a journal of the American Chemical Society.
The working principles of the device are based on sequential tunneling of single electrons between the phosphorus atom and the source and drain leads of the transistor. The tunneling can be suppressed or allowed by controlling the voltage on a nearby metal electrode with a width of a few tens of nanometers.
The rapid development of computers, which created the present information society, has been mainly based on the reduction of the size of transistors. Scientists have known for a long time that this development has to slow down critically during the future decades when the even tighter inexpensive packing of transistors would require them to shrink down to the atomic length scales. In the recently developed transistor, all the electric current passes through the same single atom. This allows researchers to study the effects arising in the extreme limit of the transistor size.
"About half a year ago, I and one of the leaders of this research, Prof. Andrew Dzurak, were asked when we expect a single-atom transistor to be fabricated. We looked at each other, smiled, and said that we have already done that," says Dr. Mikko Möttönen. "In fact, our purpose was not to build the tiniest transistor for a classical computer, but a quantum bit which would be the heart of a quantum computer that is being developed worldwide," he continues.
Problems arising when the size of a transistor is shrunk towards the ultimate limit are due to the emergence of so-called quantum mechanical effects. On one hand, these phenomena are expected to challenge the usual transistor operation. On the other hand, they allow classically irrational behavior which can, in principle, be harnessed for conceptually more efficient computing, quantum computing.
The driving force behind the measurements reported now is the idea to utilize the spin degree of freedom of an electron of the phosphorus donor as a quantum bit, a qubit. The researchers were able to observe in their experiments spin up and down states for a single phosphorus donor for the first time. This is a crucial step towards the control of these states, that is, the realization of a qubit.


Freddy Vallenilla, CAF

Flaw revealed in theory of transistor 'noise'



Engineers in the US and Taiwan have carried out an experiment that they say exposes a serious flaw in our understanding of how transistors work. The research finds that as transistors shrink, the amplitude of electronic "noise" in these devices grows even more than standard theory says it should. The researchers warn that unless our understanding of noise is reviewed, then development of next-generation laptops, mobile phones and other low-power devices could be hampered.
Transistors perform an essential role in electronic devices by amplifying and switching signals, but in order to do this reliably they must be made from highly purified materials. Defects in these materials can — like rocks in a stream — impede the flow of current and cause a transistor to malfunction. As a result, the transistor may fluctuate rapidly between its "on" and "off" states in an effect known as "random telegraph noise".

What's all that noise about?
For decades, engineers have been guided by a standard theory that says these fluctuations should become larger as transistors get ever smaller in size, spelling bad news for low-power devices. Recent findings from Kin Cheung and colleagues of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg have shown that the fluctuations may be somewhat larger than predicted and, more importantly, the frequency of their occurrence is inconsistent with conventional noise theories.
These researchers looked specifically at the most common transistor in both digital and analogue circuits — the MOSFET, or the metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor. Surprisingly, they found that even in nanoscale transistors with widths and lengths of 0.085 micrometres and 0.055 micrometres, the frequency at which the device fluctuates between on and off states does not vary much from larger transistors.
Whilst there have been previous criticisms of the standard model for noise, no-one has been able to prove unequivocally that it is flawed. Cheung and his team now say their results are the most convincing falsifier yet because they have been generated using an "ultra-thin" transistor. With the gate dielectric being only a few molecules thick, they claim they can rule out other potential sources of noise and showcase the first "absolute test" of the standard theory. "We have now used our data to examine all the alternative models and found that, to first order, none of them work,"

It's good to talk
If the current model of noise is indeed wrong then this could have a significant impact on the design of low-power technologies. The hope is that consumers will see benefits like mobile phones that can run for a week on a single charge or pacemakers that operate for a decade without requiring a change of batteries. These would require very small and reliable transistors. "We have to understand the problem before we can fix it — and troublingly, we don't know what's actually happening," said Jason Campbell, another of the NIST researchers.
Asen Asenov, an electronics researcher at the University of Glasgow in the UK believes this research addresses a pressing issue in electronics. "RTN has become dramatically important and is a main show stopper to the Flash memory scaling," he said. Asenov is concerned, however, that the researchers do not take into account that transistors occasionally capture single electrons. "[electron capture] creates localized depletion regions in the semiconductor changing the relative position of the energy level and the conduction band."
Even though Cheung and his team have taken these accurate readings, physicists will now need to carry out more research in order to confirm what is really going on in ultra-small transistors.


Freddy Vallenilla, CAF

Flaw revealed in theory of transistor 'noise'





Engineers in the US and Taiwan have carried out an experiment that they say exposes a serious flaw in our understanding of how transistors work. The research finds that as transistors shrink, the amplitude of electronic "noise" in these devices grows even more than standard theory says it should. The researchers warn that unless our understanding of noise is reviewed, then development of next-generation laptops, mobile phones and other low-power devices could be hampered.
Transistors perform an essential role in electronic devices by amplifying and switching signals, but in order to do this reliably they must be made from highly purified materials. Defects in these materials can — like rocks in a stream — impede the flow of current and cause a transistor to malfunction. As a result, the transistor may fluctuate rapidly between its "on" and "off" states in an effect known as "random telegraph noise".

What's all that noise about?
For decades, engineers have been guided by a standard theory that says these fluctuations should become larger as transistors get ever smaller in size, spelling bad news for low-power devices. Recent findings from Kin Cheung and colleagues of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg have shown that the fluctuations may be somewhat larger than predicted and, more importantly, the frequency of their occurrence is inconsistent with conventional noise theories.
These researchers looked specifically at the most common transistor in both digital and analogue circuits — the MOSFET, or the metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor. Surprisingly, they found that even in nanoscale transistors with widths and lengths of 0.085 micrometres and 0.055 micrometres, the frequency at which the device fluctuates between on and off states does not vary much from larger transistors.
Whilst there have been previous criticisms of the standard model for noise, no-one has been able to prove unequivocally that it is flawed. Cheung and his team now say their results are the most convincing falsifier yet because they have been generated using an "ultra-thin" transistor. With the gate dielectric being only a few molecules thick, they claim they can rule out other potential sources of noise and showcase the first "absolute test" of the standard theory. "We have now used our data to examine all the alternative models and found that, to first order, none of them work,"

It's good to talk
If the current model of noise is indeed wrong then this could have a significant impact on the design of low-power technologies. The hope is that consumers will see benefits like mobile phones that can run for a week on a single charge or pacemakers that operate for a decade without requiring a change of batteries. These would require very small and reliable transistors. "We have to understand the problem before we can fix it — and troublingly, we don't know what's actually happening," said Jason Campbell, another of the NIST researchers.
Asen Asenov, an electronics researcher at the University of Glasgow in the UK believes this research addresses a pressing issue in electronics. "RTN has become dramatically important and is a main show stopper to the Flash memory scaling," he said. Asenov is concerned, however, that the researchers do not take into account that transistors occasionally capture single electrons. "[electron capture] creates localized depletion regions in the semiconductor changing the relative position of the energy level and the conduction band."
Even though Cheung and his team have taken these accurate readings, physicists will now need to carry out more research in order to confirm what is really going on in ultra-small transistors.

Graphene transistor breaks new record




Graphene FET hits 100 GHz
Graphene FET hits 100 GHz
Physicists in the US have made the fastest graphene transistor ever, with a cut-off frequency of 100 GHz. The device can be further miniaturized and optimized so that it could soon outperform conventional devices made from silicon, says the team. The transistor could find application in microwave communications and imaging systems.
Graphene – a sheet of carbon just one atom thick – shows great promise for use in electronic devices because electrons can move through it at extremely high speeds. This is because they behave like relativistic particles with no rest mass. This, and other unusual physical and mechanical properties, means that the "wonder material" could replace silicon as the electronic material of choice and might be used to make faster transistors than any that exist today.
Phaedon Avouris, Yu-Ming Lin and colleagues at IBM's TJ Watson Research Center in New York began making their field-effect transistor (FET) by heating a wafer of silicon carbide (SiC) to create a surface layer of carbon atoms in the form of graphene. Parallel source and drain electrodes were then deposited on the graphene, leaving channels of exposed graphene between them.

Protecting the graphene
The next step is the trickiest – depositing a thin insulating layer onto the exposed graphene without adversely affecting its electronic properties. To do this, the team first laid down a 10 nm layer of poly-hydroxystyrene – a polymer used in commercial semiconductor processing – to protect the graphene. Then a conventional oxide layer was deposited, followed by a metallic gate electrode.
The gate length is relatively large at 240 nm, but it could be scaled down in the future to further improve device performance, say the physicists.
The graphene transistor already has a higher cut-off frequency than the best silicon MOSFETs with the same gate length (these have a cut-off frequency of around 40 GHz). The cut-off frequency is the frequency above which a transistor suffers significant degradation of its performance. The new device breaks IBM's previous record of 26 GHz, reported on in January 2009.

'Technologically relevant'
Unlike most other graphene FETs, which have been made from flakes of graphene, this device is made using techniques used by the semiconductor industry. "Our work is the first demonstration that high-performance graphene-based devices can be fabricated on a technologically relevant wafer scale," Avouris said.
One shortcoming of such graphene devices, however, is that they cannot be used in digital circuits such as those found in computers. This is because graphene has zero energy gap between its conduction and valence electrons – and it is this "band gap" that allows conventional semiconductors to switch currents from off to on.
Instead, such high-frequency transistors could be used to amplify analogue microwave signals in communications and imaging applications – including high-resolution radar, medical and security imaging.
The IBM researchers now plan to scale down their transistor, improve graphene purity and optimize device architecture. "Such transistors could then far outperform conventional devices," said Avouris.
The team is also looking at ways of creating a bandgap in a graphene transistor so that it could be used in digital applications.


Freddy Vallenilla, CAF

Resumen de Ciencia: Inventos para el 2010, transistores biodegradables y electrones escultores




Una vacuna inhalable contra el sarampión para los enfermos en países en desarrollo, un «nanogenerador» para recargar el iPod con un único movimiento de la mano o una pintura para las paredes que mata los microbios. Estas tres investigaciones forman parte de una lista de diez que se han llevado a cabo este año y que han sido nombradas como las «más prometedoras» para 2010 por los miembros de la American Chemical Society (ACS) -la sociedad más grande del mundo científico-. Los estudios han sido seleccionados entre 34.000 informes y 18.000 documentos técnicos dados a conocer a lo largo de 2009. El «top» es el siguiente:
-La primera vacuna por inhalación, sin agujas, contra el sarampión: Presentada durante la reunión nacional de ACS, la vacuna pasará a ensayo clínico el próximo año en India, donde la enfermedad todavía afecta a millones de lactantes y niños, y mata casi a 200.000 cada año. Los especialistas creen que esta vacuna es perfecta para su uso en países en desarrollo.
-La casa con «energía solar personalizada»: Los nuevos descubrimientos científicos apuestan por una energía solar «personalizada», a la medida de cada consumidor, que será el epicentro de los cambios en la producción de electricidad a partir de grandes centrales generadoras de energía a otras mucho más pequeñas, como los hogares y comunidades. El método permitiría convertir a los consumidores en productores e incluso recargar nuestros coches en nuestros propios garajes. Una gran ventaja para el medio ambiente y que implica un menor gasto.
-Una esponja de «humo congelado» para limpiar las mareas negras: Científicos de Arizona y Nueva Jersey han diseñado un aerogel, un sólido super ligero al que también llaman «humo congelado», que puede servir como esponja definitiva para capturar el petróleo vertido por accidente o en catástrofes al medio ambiente. El aerogel absorbe hasta siete veces su peso y elimina el petróleo de forma mucho más eficaz que los materiales convencionales.

-Un nanogenerador para recargar el iPod y el móvil con un gesto de la mano: ¿No sería perfecto poder recargar el móvil o el reproductor musical con un gesto de la mano? Se podría decir adiós para siempre a los cargadores. Científicos de Georgia trabajan en una técnica que convierte la energía mecánica de los movimientos del cuerpo o incluso del flujo de la sangre en energía eléctrica que puede alimentar una amplia gama de dispositivos electrónicos sin necesidad de baterías.
-Una pintura que mata los microbios: Investigadores de Dakota del Sur trabajan en el desarrollo de una pintura anti-microbiana. No sólo mata bacterias causantes de enfermedades, sino que actúa contra el moho, los hongos y los virus. Según el estudio, se trata de la pintura más «poderosa» hasta la fecha. Puede ser útil en hogares y, sobre todo, en hospitales.

-Una vacuna producida con planta de tabaco: Esta nueva vacuna, única en su origen, puede ser utilizada contra el llamado «virus de los cruceros», causante de diarreas y vómitos y la segunda infección viral más común en EE.UU. El microbio se extiende como un reguero de pólvora entre líneas de pasajeros, escuelas, oficinas y bases militares.

-Una píldora mensual contra las pulgas de las mascotas: Sólo una píldora al mes y el perro o el gato están libres de pulgas y garrapatas. La pastilla, desarrollada por científicos de Nueva Jersey, parece ser 100% eficaz y sin señales de efectos tóxicos para los animales.

-Una molécula que mide el calentamiento global que produce cada producto: Hasta ahora, era complicado conocer qué productos que salen al mercado son realmente ecológicos o tienen compuestos que pueden dañar el medio ambiente potenciando el calentamiento global. Una nueva técnica molecular podrá predecir qué materiales que van desde productos químicos utilizados en alfombras a productos electrónicos contribuyen al calentamiento.

-Un «cóctel de camarones» para el depósito de fuel: Científicos chinos trabajan en un catalizador fabricado a partir de cáscaras de camarón que podría transformar la producción de biodiesel en un proceso mucho más rápido, barato y beneficioso para el medio ambiente. De momento, sólo ha sido probado en laboratorio.

-Una nariz electrónica para detectar la enfermedad renal: Expertos israelíes han creado una «nariz electrónica» capaz de identificar en el aliento 27 sustancias clave que revelan que el paciente sufre una enfermedad del riñón. De momento, ha sido probado con éxito en ratas de laboratorio.

Transistores biodegradables:Un tipo de transistores totalmente biodegradables, fabricados recientemente por investigadores de la Universidad de Stanford, podrían utilizarse para controlar los implantes médicos temporales que se colocan en el cuerpo durante las cirugías.

Los componenentes electrónicos biodegradables "abren nuevas oportunidades para los implantes en el cuerpo," especialmente si los componentes electrónicos logran fabricarse a bajo coste, afirma Robert Langer, profesor en MIT y que no estuvo involucrado con la investigación. Los implantes podrían incorporar los componentes electrónicos orgánicos con polímeros biodegradables para el suministro de fármacos. Los doctores podrían implantar este tipo de dispositivos durante las operaciones de cirugía, después los activarían desde fuera del cuerpo con radio frecuencias para suministrar antibióticos si fuese necesario durante la recuperación. Los componentes electrónicos también podrían usarse para hacer un seguimiento del proceso de curación dentro del cuerpo. Después de que la curación hubiese finalizado, el dispositivo completo se disolvería en el cuerpo.
A principios de este mes unos investigadores de la Universidad Tufts y de la Universidad de Illinois en Urbana-Champaign informaron acerca de la construcción de componentes electrónicos de silicio sobre sustratos de seda biodegradables. Los componentes de silicio generalmente poseen un rendimiento mucho mejor que aquellos hechos de semiconductores orgánicos, aunque el silicio no es biodegradable. El grupo de Stanford, dirigido por la profesora de ingeniería química Zhenan Bao, es el primero en fabricar componentes electrónicos a partir de materiales semiconductores totalmente biodegradables. Aunque los dispositivos son estables en agua, todo lo que queda de los dispositivos después de 70 días son los contactos eléctricos de metal de apenas decenas de nanómetros de grosor.
Hasta ahora el grupo ha podido probar que es capaz de construir componentes electrónicos orgánicos que funcionan al humedecerse y que se descomponen bajo condiciones similares a las del cuerpo humano. La degradación de estos dispositivos viene provocada por una serie de condiciones similares a las que se dan en el cuerpo: una solución salina con un pH ligeramente básico descompone lentamente los transistores. Para que puedan ser estables y retener su rendimiento mientras están en uso, estos dispositivos tendrán que ser encapsulados en otra capa cuya composición se ajuste para lograr exponer el dispositivo una vez que haya sobrepasado su vida útil. El dispositivo prototipo, descrito por internet en la revista Advanced Materials, está hecho de plásticos biodegradables aprobados por la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos de los Estados Unidos, un material semiconductor biodegradable parecido al pigmento de piel conocido como melanina, y unos contactos eléctricos de oro y plata. Estos metales también están aprobados para su uso dentro del cuerpo.
Crean un haz de electrones capaz de diseñar piezas y objetos de metal:Un dispositivo desarrollado por ingenieros de la NASA permite crear formas y partes de objetos a partir de un haz de electrones. Solamente se requiere un modelo 3D de la forma a crear y un material compatible con el haz de electrones. Aunque parezca una idea más ligada a la ciencia ficción, este avance podría tener grandes aplicaciones en el terreno de la aeronáutica.
El haz de electrones de fabricación de formas libres (EBF3), desarrollado en el Langley Research Center de la NASA, hace realidad aquel viejo anhelo de trasladar a la realidad todo aquello que pensamos. Es tan sencillo como introducir un dibujo de la parte que se desea construir, presionar un botón y obtener inmediatamente la forma buscada. La investigación forma parte del Programa de Aeronáutica de la NASA.
EBF3 funciona mediante una cámara de vacío, donde el haz de electrones trabaja sobre el metal, que se funde y luego se modifica de acuerdo a los requerimientos del modelo o diseño incluido, hasta que la pieza esté completa. Aunque las opciones que brinda EBF3 no son tan amplias como las que se presentan en las novelas de ciencia ficción, su funcionamiento parece en principio alejado de este mundo.
Las aplicaciones comerciales para el EBF3 ya han sido estudiadas, además de haber ensayado su potencial, y no es para nada descabellado pensar que dentro de unos años los aviones podrán volar con grandes piezas estructurales creadas mediante este proceso. La investigación fue difundida en una nota de prensa de la NASA.
Para que el funcionamiento del EBF3 se haga realidad existen dos requisitos fundamentales: el diseño tridimensional del objeto que se busca crear debe estar disponible y el material elegido debe ser compatible para su uso con un haz de electrones. El modelo o diseño se necesita para descomponer el objeto en capas, ya que el dispositivo trabaja orientando al haz de electrones y a la fuente de metal en la reproducción del objeto, construyendo capa por capa.
En cuanto al material, debe ser compatible con el haz de electrones para que pueda ser calentado rápidamente por la corriente de energía y convertirse a su forma líquida. Según los responsables de la investigación, estas condiciones hacen que el aluminio sea un material ideal para ser empleado en este dispositivo, junto a otros metales que también poseen estas características.
Vale destacar que el EBF3 es capaz de manejar dos fuentes distintas de metal o material de alimentación, siendo capaz de proceder a su mezcla en una aleación única o incluyendo un material dentro de otro. Por ejemplo, esta potencialidad permite incluir un filamento de fibra óptica de vidrio dentro de una parte de aluminio. Gracias a esto, sería posible colocar sensores en zonas en las cuales antes era imposible hacerlo.
Aunque actualmente el equipo EBF3 probado a nivel experimental es de grandes dimensiones y un peso excesivo, lo que dificulta su funcionalidad, ya se ha creado con éxito una versión más pequeña. La misma se ha empleado en una prueba de vuelo en un avión de la NASA, que incluyó breves períodos de ingravidez. La idea es que el dispositivo permita la fabricación de piezas de repuesto en vuelo con suma facilidad, incluso en viajes espaciales.
De esta manera, en lugar de basarse en el suministro de piezas que deben aportarse desde la Tierra, los astronautas podrían ser capaces de crear objetos y formas por su cuenta en el espacio, ya sea para necesidades específicas de las exploraciones o para reparar partes averiadas de aeronaves y dispositivos varios.
Sin embargo, el potencial más importante e inmediato de este avance se ubica en el terreno de la industria de la aviación, en la cual grandes segmentos estructurales de un avión o partes de un motor a reacción podrían ser fabricados rápidamente y a un menor costo con relación a los medios convencionales, en un valor que rondaría los 1.000 dólares por libra.
El EBF3 no solamente supondría un importante ahorro de tiempo y dinero en la fabricación de piezas aeronáuticas, sino que además podría aportar interesantes condiciones ecológicas. Esto se debe a la posibilidad de emplear menores cantidades de material (por ejemplo titanio) en la fabricación de piezas, lo que significaría ahorro energético, una mayor cantidad de material disponible para su reutilización y una menor cantidad de emisiones contaminantes.
Además del reemplazo de piezas antiguas o caducas, el EBF3 podría permitir el desarrollo de nuevos aviones desde cero. Esto daría lugar a una mayor eficiencia en los motores a reacción, una tasa de consumo de combustible menor y una mayor vida útil de los componentes, al poder diseñar con mayor exactitud cada pieza.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES Secc 2

Sesenta años reduciendo el tamaño de los transistores

En 1953 se montó una radio con 4 transistores; para el 2007, el último chip de Intel tenia 820 millones.

A finales de 1947, los laboratorios Bell inventaron de la mano de John Bardeen, Walter Brattain y William Shockley el transistor, por el que recibieron el Nobel de Química en 1956. Basado en semiconductores como el silicio -deja pasar la corriente o la corta según su estado-, un transistor es algo parecido a un interruptor. Sesenta años después su descubrimiento está presente en la mayoría de los aparatos creados por el hombre gracias a la electrónica.

El transistor se aplicó de forma industrial, en primer lugar, a los aparatos de radio. Hasta entonces, las ondas sonoras se amplificaban para que las captara el oído humano mediante válvulas al vacío, muy grandes y costosas. El transistor, mucho más barato, y sobre todo más pequeño, permite amplificarlas igualmente, pues otra de las virtudes del transistor, además de cerrar o abrir el paso a la corriente o al audio, es dejarla pasar con mayor o menor intensidad. Así, en 1954 se vendió en EE UU la primera radio con transistores, en concreto con cuatro. Sin embargo, el primer aparato que montó un transistor fue un sonotone un año antes.

En aquella época, los transistores se fabricaban de uno en uno, y se aplicaban a radios, teléfonos o, incluso, ordenadores. Estos últimos realizan sus cálculos, procesan datos, reproducen DVD o visualizan fotografías basándose en una información binaria de únicamente dos posiciones. Concretamente del 1, que se obtiene cuando el transistor deja pasar la corriente, y del 0, cuando no. Sin embargo, para que los ordenadores pudieran desarrollar instrucciones más complejas, no valía con un único transistor. El reto fue comunicar muchos transistores y eso se consiguió con los circuitos integrados de transistores. A partir de aquí, la carrera fue vertiginosa.

Intel, el primer fabricante mundial de chips para ordenadores, ha mantenido la apuesta, lanzada por uno de sus fundadores, Gordon Moore, de duplicar cada dos años el número de transistores que se montan en un chip o procesador. A más transistores más órdenes se pueden dar, lo que redunda en mayor velocidad y mayor capacidad para realizar operaciones más complejas.

Pero las exigencias del mercado, que busca ordenadores más rápidos y capaces de funciones mucho más sofisticadas, obliga a seguir reduciendo el tamaño. Antonino Albarrán, director tecnológico de Intel Iberia, asegura que todavía hay camino. De hecho, dentro de dos años se trabajará a 32 nanómetros y para 2020 se alcanzarán los 7 u 8, el límite. Para ello, los chip del futuro no serán planos sino tridimensionales. Eso sí, el ojo humano no podrá apreciarlo.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES Secc 2

Organic light-emitting transistors outperforming OLEDs

OLEDs – organic light-emitting diodes – are full of promise for a range of practical applications. OLED technology is based on the phenomenon that certain organic materials emit light when fed by an electric current and it is already used in small electronic device displays in mobile phones, MP3 players, digital cameras, and also some TV screens. With more efficient and cheaper OLED technologies it will possible to make ultra flat, very bright and power-saving OLED televisions, windows that could be used as light source at night, and large-scale organic solar cells. In contrast to regular LEDs, the emissive electroluminescent layer of an OLED consists of a thin-film of organic compounds. What makes OLEDs so attractive is that they do not require a backlight to function and therefore require less power to operate; also, since they are thinner than comparable LEDs, they can be printed onto almost any substrate.

Nonetheless, exciton quenching and photon loss processes still limit OLED efficiency and brightness. Organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) are alternative, planar light sources combining, in the same architecture, the switching mechanism of a thin-film transistor and an electroluminescent device. Thus, OLETs could open a new era in organic optoelectronics and serve as test beds to address general fundamental optoelectronic and photonic issues.

"OLET is a new light-emission concept, providing planar light sources that can be easily integrated in substrates of different nature – silicon, glass, plastic, paper, etc. – using standard microelectronic techniques," Michele Muccini, a researcher at the Institute of Nanostructured Materials (ISMN) in Bologna, Italy, explains to Nanowerk. "The focus of OLET development is the possibility to enable new display/light source technologies, and exploit a transport geometry to suppress the deleterious photon losses and exciton quenching mechanisms inherent in the OLED architecture."


Trilayer OLET device structure and active materials forming the heterostructure. Schematic representation of the trilayer OLET device with the chemical structure of each material making up the device active region. The field-effect charge transport and the light-generation processes are also sketched.


Motivated by the need to unravel the full potential of field-effect transistors as a photonic technology platform, Muccini and his team have now demonstrated that OLETs enable the control of quenching and electrode-induced photon loss processes in an organic light-emitting device. These fundamental processes are those that still limit efficiency and brightness of OLED technology.


Reporting their findings in a paper in the May 2, 2010 online edition of Nature Materials ("Organic light-emitting transistors with an efficiency that outperforms the equivalent light-emitting diodes"), the scientists demonstrated the advantages of using an OLET versus an OLED configuration, and enabled OLETs with the highest efficiency reported so far.


"We show that the same organic emitting layer leads to more efficient device emission when it is incorporated in the OLET structure than in the OLED one" says Muccini. "Our devices provide planar micrometer-size light sources that might enable organic photonic applications like integrated on-chip bio-sensing and high resolution display technology with embedded electronics."


The Italian team introduced the concept of using a p-channel/emitter/n-channel tri-layer semiconducting heterostructure in OLETs providing a novel approach to dramatically improve OLET performance. According to Muccini, these devices are more than 100 times more efficient than the equivalent OLED, over 2 times more efficient than the optimized OLED with the same emitting layer, and over ten times more efficient than any other reported OLET.


The trilayer heterostructure OLETs used by the researchers were fabricated on glass/indium tin oxide/PMMA substrates. The active region consists of the superposition of three organic layers. The first, in contact with the PMMA dielectric, and the third layers are field-effect electron-transporting (n-type) and hole-transporting (p-type) semiconductors, respectively, whereas the middle layer is a light-emitting hostguest matrix. These three layers are 62nm thick. The device structure is completed by the deposition of 50nm gold contacts as source and drain.


"To enable the vertical charge diffusion process, the basis of the OLET electroluminescence mechanism, energetic compatibility between the materials forming the heterostructure is required," explains Muccini. "Furthermore, the morphology of these films must allow the formation of a continuous multistack. Meeting these requirements is not trivial and it took us several attempts to identify the appropriate film material."
"The new trilayer heterostructure field-effect concept unravels the full potential of the light-emitting field-effect technology and restricts the limitation of OLEDs to only materials-related issues," he continues. "Improvements in the top-layer field-effect mobility at high current density coupled to the use of triplet emitters will enable OLETs with even higher EQE and brightness."

He notes that ongoing research directions include the control of photonic processes within the device to improve light confinement, guiding and extraction. In addition device reliability and lifetime under operational conditions need to be thoroughly addressed.
"A critical parameter to be addressed for the future development of the OLET technology is the device operating voltage" says Muccini. "The power efficiency at a given voltage is an essential figure-of-merit of any light-emitting device. Lower operating voltages are to be targeted using high-capacitance gate insulators. However, despite the necessary technical improvements, we believe that our tri-layer OLETs represent a viable route towards practical organic light-emitting devices with unprecedented performances."
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES Secc 2

Científicos construyen transistor de un solo átomo


Investigadores de la Universidad Tecnológica de Helsinki (Finlandia), Universidad de New South Wales (Australia), y la Universidad de Melbourne (Australia) han conseguido crear un transistor funcional de un solo átomo.
Los transistores más pequeños de hoy (nanotransistores, como los que se empaquetan en los chips) contienen miles de átomos, pero hay varios grupos de científicos que trabajan en reducciones de escala que llevan los transistores a tamaños de apenas unos átomos, incluso de uno solo. Una de las maneras de hacer un transistor de un solo átomo es colocar este átomo entre dos electrodos, lo cual requiere que se logre primero construir un artefacto con dos caras de metal (los electrodos) separadas por el espacio de un átomo.

Para lograr esto los investigadores se basaron en el efecto túnel, que en la mecánica cuántica es un fenómeno nanoscópico por el que una partícula viola los principios de la mecánica clásica penetrando una barrera potencial o impedancia mayor que la energía cinética de la propia partícula. De manera que el transistor trabaja mediante el tuneleado energético de electrones entre la fuente y el drenador a través de un átomo de fósforo (Ver: transistores MOSFET). El túnel puede ser suprimido o autorizado controlando la tensión en un metal cerca del electrodo con un ancho de unas pocas decenas de nanómetros.

El detalle es que el núcleo del transistor es en efecto sólo un átomo, pero la parte complementaria, sobre todo el electrodo es muy voluminoso (en términos atómicos) y no deja empaquetar más transistores en un circuito integrado como lo que ya podemos encontrar con la tecnología de semiconductores actuales.

Sin embargo, como explicó el Dr. Möttönen, el equipo no estaba interesado en construir el transistor más pequeño para un equipo clásico, sino más bien un bit cuántico (Qubit) que sería el principio de una computadora cuántica. Aún así el descubrimiento resulta muy importante ya que al pasar corriente eléctrica por un solo átomo, se pueden estudiar los fenómenos que surgen en condiciones de tamaño extremo.

Por primera vez, los investigadores pudieron observar el "espín hacia arriba" y "espín hacia abajo", que se traducen en "1″ y "0″ respectivamente para un átomo de fósforo. Este es otro paso importante hacia el control de estos estados y en última instancia, la realización de un bit cuántico estable.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES Secc 2

Inexpensive, Unbreakable Displays

Researchers at HP are scaling up a process for making silicon electronics on rolls of plastic.

A researcher at Hewlett-Packard Labs holds a 33-centimeter-­wide roll of plastic covered with amorphous-silicon transistor arrays designed to control pixels in displays. Credit: Jen Siska
Carl Taussig unfurls a roll of silvery plastic patterned with arrays of small iridescent squares, each a few centimeters across. The plastic in his hands, along with the scraps and scrolls of the material scattered on benchtops and desks in the rooms of Hewlett-Packard Labs in Palo Alto, CA, may look like silver wrapping paper, but each square contains thousands of silicon transistors. The transistors can switch pixels in displays on and off as fast as those in conventional flat-screen monitors and televisions, but they're far cheaper to fabricate and more resilient.
In today's displays, whether they're flat-panel TVs or iPads, the electronics that control the pixels are made of amorphous silicon on glass. Taussig's goal is to replace these heavy, fragile, expensive displays with lightweight, rugged, inexpensive ones made on plastic--without compromising performance. He is using high-volume roll-to-roll mechanics, the type of high-speed manufacturing process used in newspaper production, to make high-performance transistor arrays on the 33-centimeter-wide plastic rolls. HP researchers are now engineering a process for a planned pilot plant, where the company will produce the arrays at volumes of about 46,500 square meters a year through a partnership with Phicot, a manufacturer of thin-film electronics based in Ames, IA.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES Secc 2

Interruptor ES 93 electrónicos de velocidad

Con base en España, *Eurohübner España presenta a sus clientes los interruptores de velocidad electrónicos ES 93 con 3 velocidades de conmutación regulables para el control de la velocidad. Los interruptores de velocidad electrónicos ES 93 posee una acción interruptora inmediata en cualquier dirección con rearme automático, e incorpora una versión ES R con módulo de relé, con tres salidas de relé con contactos aislados. El ES 93 posee tres salidas independientes a transistores, y funcionamiento a prueba de fallos de relé en caso de fallas de energías o desperfectos del cable de señal y se puede aplicar en modo prueba fallos con combinación de centrífuga y interruptor de velocidad electrónico. EL ES 93 está disponible como ESL con la posibilidad de poder combinarse con codificadores incrementales. En el modelo ES 93 la tensión de tacho rectificada, se alimenta en base a tres potenciómetros que configuran tres velocidades de conmutación independientes entre si, cuando alguna de estas tensiones llega al límite impuesto respectivo, se desencadena una señal que interrumpe el proceso. Los ES 93 funciona con suministro externo o tensión de corriente continua de baja, y cuando ocurre un cambio de velocidad límite o en el caso de una falla eléctrica o de la señal.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES Secc 2

A Better Way to Make Graphene

A new method could allow more practical manufacturing of the material.

Single-atom-thick sheets of carbon called graphene have some amazing properties: graphene is strong, highly electrically conductive, flexible, and transparent. This makes it a promising material to make flexible touch screens and superstrong structural materials. But creating these thin carbon sheets, and then building things out of them, is difficult to do outside the lab.

Now an advance in making and processing graphene in solution may make it practical to work with the material at manufacturing scale. Researchers at Rice University have made graphene solutions 10 times more concentrated than any before. They've used these solutions to make transparent, conductive sheets similar to the electrodes on displays, and they're currently developing methods for spinning the graphene solutions to generate fibers and structural materials for airplanes and other vehicles that promise to be less expensive than today's carbon fiber.

Now an advance in making and processing graphene in solution may make it practical to work with the material at manufacturing scale. Researchers at Rice University have made graphene solutions 10 times more concentrated than any before. They've used these solutions to make transparent, conductive sheets similar to the electrodes on displays, and they're currently developing methods for spinning the graphene solutions to generate fibers and structural materials for airplanes and other vehicles that promise to be less expensive than today's carbon fiber.
Most methods for making graphene start with graphite and involve flaking off atom-thin sheets of graphene, usually using chemical means. "The key is to make single-layer graphene, to not destroy it in the process, and to do it in high volume," says Yang Yang, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. Some of the existing methods for making graphene from graphite and then manipulating it in solution involve adding soluble groups to the surface of the molecule, but this chemical change destroys graphene's electrical properties.

The Rice researchers make graphene solutions using a method they initially developed for working with carbon nanotubes. About five years ago, researchers led by the late Nobel laureate Richard Smalley discovered that highly concentrated sulfuric acid, so strong it's called a "superacid," can bring carbon nanotubes into solution by coating their surfaces with ions. Last year, the Rice group, now led by chemist Matteo Pasquali, showed they could use superacid solutions of carbon nanotubes to make fibers hundreds of meters long; the group has contracted with a major chemical company to commercialize the process.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
EES
Secc 2

Designing a radio with a single type of transistor


What do you do once you are already a skilled radio designer and restorer? Well, if you are Greg Charvat, you decide to build a shortwave radio using a single type of transistor as an active element. Normally, one would use number of different transistors, each designed to handle different amounts of power and amplifying bandwidth. Limiting yourself to a single type may seem like a mental exercise today (pun intended), but was apparently much more common back when transistors weren't easy to come by, so Greg isn't completely off his rocker. Also, by only using one kind of part, it should make repairs much easier.


Designing a radio like this is a little bit complicated, but not nearly as much as it might sound. The trick is to divide the radio function into manageable pieces, which can then be designed and tested individually. You will notice that Greg's radio (pictured above) is made up of a bunch of small prototyping boards. Each board contains a single circuit with a specific function, and physically separating them makes it much easier to test the parts, as well as swap out the ones that might be malfunctioning. It's also a neat design aesthetic, because it very closely resembles the way you would draw an electrical schematic to represent the circuit.


If you are interested in building a radio, I would strongly recommend giving it a go. Start with a kit, though, and pick one that explains the design of each stage so that you can learn how it works. It will definitely be an interesting experience, and who knows, it could be the start of a new passion! If you have a favorite kit or other guide to recommend, chime in on the comments.
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
Secc 2

Fujitsu Laboratories Develops Gallium-Nitride HEMT Amplifier Featuring World's Highest Output in the C-Ku Band

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced the development of an amplifier based on gallium-nitride (GaN), high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) technology, which features an output of 12.9W - more than twice the output of previous amplifiers and presently featuring the world's highest amplification output - when operating in the wide band range of the C-band, X-band, and Ku-band, radio frequency spectrums between 6GHz-18GHz. By employing this amplifier, it will be possible to operate systems such as aviation radar - which conventionally utilize separate communications equipment for different frequency ranges - with a single amplifier, thereby enabling the development of smaller, lighter radar equipment and wireless communications systems that are capable of covering wide areas.
Details of this technology have been presented at the IEEE MTT International Microwave Symposium (IMS 2010) being held in Anaheim, U.S. between May 23-28.
About Gallium-Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors
Gallium-nitride (GaN) is used in blue-LEDs for traffic signal lights, and as a semiconductor material GaN enables electrons to move faster than in conventional semiconductor materials, such as silicon (Si) and gallium-arsenide (GaAs). GaN also features a higher breakdown voltage (threshold) compared to such conventional semiconductor materials.
Given these characteristics, GaN HEMTs - a kind of GaN-based transistor - are anticipated to offer high-output high-efficiency operation.
Background
Aircraft radar typically switches between the C-band, which is relatively unaffected by rain, and the X- and Ku-bands which offer high-precision detection of solid objects. An amplifier featuring the ability to cover - on its own - the entire range of the C- to Ku-bands would allow for smaller systems that consume less power. This has led to keen interest in multifunctional radars, which integrate communications systems and multiple radars and into a single device.
Technological Issues
To achieve the output needed to cover large spectrums such as the C- to Ku-bands, in the past multiple transistors have been connected in parallel to create an amplification circuit. However, as the circuit is physically longer, line loss increases, thus making it difficult to extend coverage up to 18GHz.
Newly-developed Technology
Fujitsu Laboratories developed a high-output GaN HEMT amplifier that covers the ultra-broadband C-Ku spectrum (6GHz-18GHz).
Key features of the new technology are as follows:
1. Band-extending circuit technology:Fujitsu Laboratories devised a band extension circuit that compensates line losses at high frequencies, and employed the circuit in an amplifier for the first time ever. 2. Circuit technology for dividing and combining electrical power over broadband:Fujitsu Laboratories developed a circuit that handles the dividing and combining of electrical power across an ultra-wide spectrum, and built the circuit on the semiconductor chip.
Results
The newly-developed GaN HEMT amplifier was proven to produce 12.9W of power over the wide 6GHz-18GHz spectrum with 18% efficiency(4). This amplification output is more than double (2x) the output of existing ultra-broadband, high-frequency amplifiers, and represents the world's highest level of performance.
This new technology will make it possible for a single amplifier to operate at multiple frequencies, paving the way for further integration of systems, such as broadband communications systems and radar systems that utilize various frequencies, thus allowing for more compact and lighter equipment. The technology can also be used in measuring instruments in order to measure the performance of amplifiers used in broadband communications and radar systems.
Future Developments
Fujitsu Laboratories plans to apply this technology to a wide range of applications that require high output across wide bandwidths, including wireless communications and radar.
(1) Gallium-nitride (GaN):GaN-based semiconductors are wide bandgap semiconductors that feature a higher breakdown-voltage (threshold) than conventional semiconductor materials, such as silicon (Si) or gallium-arsenide (GaAs).
(2) High-electron mobility transistor (HEMT):A field-effect transistor that utilizes the electron movement at the junction between two semiconductors with different band gaps - the electronic movement in HEMTs is faster compared to that of conventional semiconductors. Fujitsu led the industry with its development of HEMT technology in 1980, and HEMTs are currently used in a wide range of core technologies for IT applications, including satellite transceivers, mobile phones, GPS-based navigations systems, and broadband wireless networking systems.
(3) C-band, X-band, Ku-band:Common names for each frequency band. The C-band covers 4GHz-8GHz and is not prone to attenuation from rain or fog. Applications employing C-band include satellite communications, fixed wireless networking, wireless access networking, air-traffic control radar, weather radar, etc. The X-band covers 8GHz -12GHz, and has only minimal impact from crosstalk and interference, thereby making the X-band difficult to be intercepted or jammed. The X-band is often used in satellite communications, air-traffic control radar, and weather radar. The Ku-band covers 12GHz-18GHz, and has only minimal impact from crosstalk and interference, thus making the Ku-band difficult to be intercepted or jammed. Ku-band applications include satellite communications and various types of radar.
(4) 18% efficiency:Efficiency refers to the ratio of the high-frequency (h.f.) output power to the DC input power, taking into account the power amplifier gain.
It is calculated as: Efficiency = 100*(h.f. output power - h.f. input power/(DC input power)
Jean Lucas Mendez
20122876
Seccion 2

Un transistor monomolecular basado en el fulereno C60 y electrodos superconductores


La escala de integración más alta posible para un transistor es utilizar una única molécula. El problema de este tipo de transistores monomoleculares es la presencia de estados cuánticos espurios para la conductancia que penalizan su funcionamiento. Una manera de evitar estos efectos es utilizar contactos superconductores. Investigadores franceses han logrado el primer transistor monomolecular fiable basado en una molécula del fulereno C60 entre dos electrodos de Alumino/Oro cuyo único inconveniente es que funciona a una temperatura por debajo de 1 Kelvin. El artículo técnico es "Superconductivity in a single-C60 transistor"
Jean Lucas Mendez Torres
20122876
Seccion 2

Resumen de Ciencia: Inventos para el 2010, transistores biodegradables y electrones escultores




Una vacuna inhalable contra el sarampión para los enfermos en países en desarrollo, un «nanogenerador» para recargar el iPod con un único movimiento de la mano o una pintura para las paredes que mata los microbios. Estas tres investigaciones forman parte de una lista de diez que se han llevado a cabo este año y que han sido nombradas como las «más prometedoras» para 2010 por los miembros de la American Chemical Society (ACS) -la sociedad más grande del mundo científico-. Los estudios han sido seleccionados entre 34.000 informes y 18.000 documentos técnicos dados a conocer a lo largo de 2009. El «top» es el siguiente:
-La primera vacuna por inhalación, sin agujas, contra el sarampión: Presentada durante la reunión nacional de ACS, la vacuna pasará a ensayo clínico el próximo año en India, donde la enfermedad todavía afecta a millones de lactantes y niños, y mata casi a 200.000 cada año. Los especialistas creen que esta vacuna es perfecta para su uso en países en desarrollo.
-La casa con «energía solar personalizada»: Los nuevos descubrimientos científicos apuestan por una energía solar «personalizada», a la medida de cada consumidor, que será el epicentro de los cambios en la producción de electricidad a partir de grandes centrales generadoras de energía a otras mucho más pequeñas, como los hogares y comunidades. El método permitiría convertir a los consumidores en productores e incluso recargar nuestros coches en nuestros propios garajes. Una gran ventaja para el medio ambiente y que implica un menor gasto.
-Una esponja de «humo congelado» para limpiar las mareas negras: Científicos de Arizona y Nueva Jersey han diseñado un aerogel, un sólido super ligero al que también llaman «humo congelado», que puede servir como esponja definitiva para capturar el petróleo vertido por accidente o en catástrofes al medio ambiente. El aerogel absorbe hasta siete veces su peso y elimina el petróleo de forma mucho más eficaz que los materiales convencionales.

-Un nanogenerador para recargar el iPod y el móvil con un gesto de la mano: ¿No sería perfecto poder recargar el móvil o el reproductor musical con un gesto de la mano? Se podría decir adiós para siempre a los cargadores. Científicos de Georgia trabajan en una técnica que convierte la energía mecánica de los movimientos del cuerpo o incluso del flujo de la sangre en energía eléctrica que puede alimentar una amplia gama de dispositivos electrónicos sin necesidad de baterías.
-Una pintura que mata los microbios: Investigadores de Dakota del Sur trabajan en el desarrollo de una pintura anti-microbiana. No sólo mata bacterias causantes de enfermedades, sino que actúa contra el moho, los hongos y los virus. Según el estudio, se trata de la pintura más «poderosa» hasta la fecha. Puede ser útil en hogares y, sobre todo, en hospitales.

-Una vacuna producida con planta de tabaco: Esta nueva vacuna, única en su origen, puede ser utilizada contra el llamado «virus de los cruceros», causante de diarreas y vómitos y la segunda infección viral más común en EE.UU. El microbio se extiende como un reguero de pólvora entre líneas de pasajeros, escuelas, oficinas y bases militares.

-Una píldora mensual contra las pulgas de las mascotas: Sólo una píldora al mes y el perro o el gato están libres de pulgas y garrapatas. La pastilla, desarrollada por científicos de Nueva Jersey, parece ser 100% eficaz y sin señales de efectos tóxicos para los animales.

-Una molécula que mide el calentamiento global que produce cada producto: Hasta ahora, era complicado conocer qué productos que salen al mercado son realmente ecológicos o tienen compuestos que pueden dañar el medio ambiente potenciando el calentamiento global. Una nueva técnica molecular podrá predecir qué materiales que van desde productos químicos utilizados en alfombras a productos electrónicos contribuyen al calentamiento.

-Un «cóctel de camarones» para el depósito de fuel: Científicos chinos trabajan en un catalizador fabricado a partir de cáscaras de camarón que podría transformar la producción de biodiesel en un proceso mucho más rápido, barato y beneficioso para el medio ambiente. De momento, sólo ha sido probado en laboratorio.

-Una nariz electrónica para detectar la enfermedad renal: Expertos israelíes han creado una «nariz electrónica» capaz de identificar en el aliento 27 sustancias clave que revelan que el paciente sufre una enfermedad del riñón. De momento, ha sido probado con éxito en ratas de laboratorio.

Transistores biodegradables:Un tipo de transistores totalmente biodegradables, fabricados recientemente por investigadores de la Universidad de Stanford, podrían utilizarse para controlar los implantes médicos temporales que se colocan en el cuerpo durante las cirugías.

Los componenentes electrónicos biodegradables "abren nuevas oportunidades para los implantes en el cuerpo," especialmente si los componentes electrónicos logran fabricarse a bajo coste, afirma Robert Langer, profesor en MIT y que no estuvo involucrado con la investigación. Los implantes podrían incorporar los componentes electrónicos orgánicos con polímeros biodegradables para el suministro de fármacos. Los doctores podrían implantar este tipo de dispositivos durante las operaciones de cirugía, después los activarían desde fuera del cuerpo con radio frecuencias para suministrar antibióticos si fuese necesario durante la recuperación. Los componentes electrónicos también podrían usarse para hacer un seguimiento del proceso de curación dentro del cuerpo. Después de que la curación hubiese finalizado, el dispositivo completo se disolvería en el cuerpo.
A principios de este mes unos investigadores de la Universidad Tufts y de la Universidad de Illinois en Urbana-Champaign informaron acerca de la construcción de componentes electrónicos de silicio sobre sustratos de seda biodegradables. Los componentes de silicio generalmente poseen un rendimiento mucho mejor que aquellos hechos de semiconductores orgánicos, aunque el silicio no es biodegradable. El grupo de Stanford, dirigido por la profesora de ingeniería química Zhenan Bao, es el primero en fabricar componentes electrónicos a partir de materiales semiconductores totalmente biodegradables. Aunque los dispositivos son estables en agua, todo lo que queda de los dispositivos después de 70 días son los contactos eléctricos de metal de apenas decenas de nanómetros de grosor.
Hasta ahora el grupo ha podido probar que es capaz de construir componentes electrónicos orgánicos que funcionan al humedecerse y que se descomponen bajo condiciones similares a las del cuerpo humano. La degradación de estos dispositivos viene provocada por una serie de condiciones similares a las que se dan en el cuerpo: una solución salina con un pH ligeramente básico descompone lentamente los transistores. Para que puedan ser estables y retener su rendimiento mientras están en uso, estos dispositivos tendrán que ser encapsulados en otra capa cuya composición se ajuste para lograr exponer el dispositivo una vez que haya sobrepasado su vida útil. El dispositivo prototipo, descrito por internet en la revista Advanced Materials, está hecho de plásticos biodegradables aprobados por la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos de los Estados Unidos, un material semiconductor biodegradable parecido al pigmento de piel conocido como melanina, y unos contactos eléctricos de oro y plata. Estos metales también están aprobados para su uso dentro del cuerpo.
Crean un haz de electrones capaz de diseñar piezas y objetos de metal:Un dispositivo desarrollado por ingenieros de la NASA permite crear formas y partes de objetos a partir de un haz de electrones. Solamente se requiere un modelo 3D de la forma a crear y un material compatible con el haz de electrones. Aunque parezca una idea más ligada a la ciencia ficción, este avance podría tener grandes aplicaciones en el terreno de la aeronáutica.
El haz de electrones de fabricación de formas libres (EBF3), desarrollado en el Langley Research Center de la NASA, hace realidad aquel viejo anhelo de trasladar a la realidad todo aquello que pensamos. Es tan sencillo como introducir un dibujo de la parte que se desea construir, presionar un botón y obtener inmediatamente la forma buscada. La investigación forma parte del Programa de Aeronáutica de la NASA.
EBF3 funciona mediante una cámara de vacío, donde el haz de electrones trabaja sobre el metal, que se funde y luego se modifica de acuerdo a los requerimientos del modelo o diseño incluido, hasta que la pieza esté completa. Aunque las opciones que brinda EBF3 no son tan amplias como las que se presentan en las novelas de ciencia ficción, su funcionamiento parece en principio alejado de este mundo.
Las aplicaciones comerciales para el EBF3 ya han sido estudiadas, además de haber ensayado su potencial, y no es para nada descabellado pensar que dentro de unos años los aviones podrán volar con grandes piezas estructurales creadas mediante este proceso. La investigación fue difundida en una nota de prensa de la NASA.
Para que el funcionamiento del EBF3 se haga realidad existen dos requisitos fundamentales: el diseño tridimensional del objeto que se busca crear debe estar disponible y el material elegido debe ser compatible para su uso con un haz de electrones. El modelo o diseño se necesita para descomponer el objeto en capas, ya que el dispositivo trabaja orientando al haz de electrones y a la fuente de metal en la reproducción del objeto, construyendo capa por capa.
En cuanto al material, debe ser compatible con el haz de electrones para que pueda ser calentado rápidamente por la corriente de energía y convertirse a su forma líquida. Según los responsables de la investigación, estas condiciones hacen que el aluminio sea un material ideal para ser empleado en este dispositivo, junto a otros metales que también poseen estas características.
Vale destacar que el EBF3 es capaz de manejar dos fuentes distintas de metal o material de alimentación, siendo capaz de proceder a su mezcla en una aleación única o incluyendo un material dentro de otro. Por ejemplo, esta potencialidad permite incluir un filamento de fibra óptica de vidrio dentro de una parte de aluminio. Gracias a esto, sería posible colocar sensores en zonas en las cuales antes era imposible hacerlo.
Aunque actualmente el equipo EBF3 probado a nivel experimental es de grandes dimensiones y un peso excesivo, lo que dificulta su funcionalidad, ya se ha creado con éxito una versión más pequeña. La misma se ha empleado en una prueba de vuelo en un avión de la NASA, que incluyó breves períodos de ingravidez. La idea es que el dispositivo permita la fabricación de piezas de repuesto en vuelo con suma facilidad, incluso en viajes espaciales.
De esta manera, en lugar de basarse en el suministro de piezas que deben aportarse desde la Tierra, los astronautas podrían ser capaces de crear objetos y formas por su cuenta en el espacio, ya sea para necesidades específicas de las exploraciones o para reparar partes averiadas de aeronaves y dispositivos varios.
Sin embargo, el potencial más importante e inmediato de este avance se ubica en el terreno de la industria de la aviación, en la cual grandes segmentos estructurales de un avión o partes de un motor a reacción podrían ser fabricados rápidamente y a un menor costo con relación a los medios convencionales, en un valor que rondaría los 1.000 dólares por libra.
El EBF3 no solamente supondría un importante ahorro de tiempo y dinero en la fabricación de piezas aeronáuticas, sino que además podría aportar interesantes condiciones ecológicas. Esto se debe a la posibilidad de emplear menores cantidades de material (por ejemplo titanio) en la fabricación de piezas, lo que significaría ahorro energético, una mayor cantidad de material disponible para su reutilización y una menor cantidad de emisiones contaminantes.
Además del reemplazo de piezas antiguas o caducas, el EBF3 podría permitir el desarrollo de nuevos aviones desde cero. Esto daría lugar a una mayor eficiencia en los motores a reacción, una tasa de consumo de combustible menor y una mayor vida útil de los componentes, al poder diseñar con mayor exactitud cada pieza.

transistor



A device composed of semiconductor material that amplifies a signal or opens or closes a circuit. Invented in 1947 at Bell Labs, transistors have become the key ingredient of all digital circuits, including computers. Today's microprocessors contains tens of millions of microscopic transistors.

Prior to the invention of transistors, digital circuits were composed of vacuum tubes, which had many disadvantages. They were much larger, required more energy, dissipated more heat, and were more prone to failures. It's safe to say that without the invention of transistors, computing as we know it today would not be possible.



Freddy Vallenilla, CAF

Amplificador Diferencial



Los Amplificadores Operacionales y otros circuitos analógicos, suelen basarse en:

1 - Los amplificadores diferenciales
2 - Etapas de ganancia implementados por amplificadores intermedios acoplados en corriente continua y...
3 - Una etapa de salida tipo push-pull (etapa clase B en contrafase)

Viendo el siguiente gráfico, se muesta el diagrama de bloques con la configuración interna de un amplificador operacional.

Diagrama de bloques de un amplificador operacional - Electrónica Unicrom

Principio de funcionamiento del Amplificador diferencial

Al analizar el gráfico de la derecha.    

Amplificador diferencial - Electrónica Unicrom
El amplificador diferencial básico tiene 2 entradas V1 y V2.

Si la tensión de V1 aumenta, la corriente del emisor del transistor Q1 aumenta (acordarse que IE = BxIB), causando una caida de tensión en Re.

Si la tensión de V2 se mantiene constante, la tensión entre base y emisor del transistor Q2 disminuye, reduciéndose también la corriente de emisor del mismo transistor.

Esto causa que la tensión de colector de Q2 (Vout+) aumente.

La entrada V1 es la entrada no inversora de un amplificador operacional

Del mismo modo cuando la tensión en V2 aumenta, también aumenta la la corriente de colector del transistor Q2, causando que la tensión de colector del mismo transistor disminuya. (Vout+) disminuye.

La entrada V2 es la entrada inversora del amplificador operacional

Si el valor de la resistencia RE fuera muy grande, obligaría a la suma de las corrientes de emisor de los transistor Q1 y Q2, a mantenerse constante, comportándose como una fuente de corriente

Entonces, al aumentar la corriente de colector de un transistor, disminuirá la corriente de colector del otro transistor.

Por eso cuando la tensión V1 crece, la tensión en V2 decrece.


Freddy Vallenilla, CAF